Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device.

Appl Phys Lett. 2013 ;103(8):83108.

Pirozzi KL, Long CJ, McAleer CW, Smith AS, Hickman JJ.

NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, 12424 Research Parkway, Orlando, Florida 32826, USA.

 

Abstract

 

Rigorous analysis of muscle function in in vitro systems is needed for both acute and chronic biomedical applications. Forces generated by skeletal myotubes on bio-microelectromechanical cantilevers were calculated using a modified version of Stoney’s thin-film equation and finite element analysis (FEA), then analyzed for regression to physical parameters. The Stoney’s equation results closely matched the more intensive FEA and the force correlated to cross-sectional area (CSA). Normalizing force to measured CSA significantly improved the statistical sensitivity and now allows for close comparison of in vitro data to in vivo measurements for applications in exercise physiology, robotics, and modeling neuromuscular diseases.

 

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figured Legend:  Hybrid Systems Lab’s cantilever technology facilitates real-time assessment of skeletal muscle force production in vitro. A) Rat muscle myotube maintained in culture for 21 days. B) Image of the custom built cantilever chips used in this study. C) Schematic demonstrating the application of a laser beam to measure cantilever displacement in response to muscle contraction across an entire cantilever array. D) Representative image of data read out demonstrating recording of cantilever deflection (upper trace) in response to timed broad field electrical stimulation pulses (lower trace).

 

Correlation of embryonic skeletal muscle myotube physical characteristics with contractile force generation on an atomic force microscope-based bio-microelectromechanical systems device copy