Synthesis of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Nanoparticles in Confined Environment, and their Characterization

Significance Statement

The microemulsion technique for synthesizing materials with minute sizes has developed interest due to its ability to uniformly disperse small particles and stabilize the disperse phase of either oil or water with the aid of surfactants.

Italian researchers synthesized yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) nanopowders from the thermal treatment of yttrium and aluminum hydroxides prepared in an aqueous solution/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide/butane/n-heptane microemulsion. The work is now published in Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects.

Following preparation of yttrium aluminum garnet nanopowders, the authors determined their microemulsion property by taking certain measurements involving kinematic viscosity, electrical conductivity and small angle x-rays scattering coupled with transmission electron microscopy analysis and wide angle x-ray scattering measurements to investigate the features of the yttrium aluminum garnet nanopowders.

Outcomes acquired from the kinematic viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicated three-phase change form microemulsion containing ammonia solution while a two-phase change became observed for the nitrate solution of yttrium and aluminum.

The authors observed as water content increases, the dispersal of water clusters in the oil phase of microemulsion containing ammonia solution changed from a bi-continuous phase to a lamellar phase, before returning to a bi-continuous phase. With emulsions containing nitrate solutions of yttrium and aluminum, increase in water content led to a solely observed bi-continuous phase as lamellar phase was not interpreted. Measurements from the small angle x-rays scattering techniques additionally expressed similar views with the results obtained from the kinematic viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements.

Wide angle x-ray scattering measurements confirmed two lattice parameters value for the R20 nanopowders which indicated two crystalline phases. The R70 nanopowders with a single lattice parameters value confirmed a monocrystalline phase, indicating a pure garnet phase.

The authors confirmed polygon shapes with high tendency to agglomerate for the R20 nanopowders using transmission electron microscopy analysis. In contrast, the R70 yttrium aluminum garnet nanopowders were spherically-shaped with lower tendency for agglomeration.

This study was able to offer a platform for generating yttrium aluminum garnet nanopowders with uniform dispersed sizes and extinct agglomeration.

Synthesis of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Nanoparticles in Confined Environment, and their Characterization - advances in engineering

About The Author

Francesco Armetta is a third year Ph.D. student at Università di Palermo. He holds a master degree in Chemistry from Università di Palermo. His Ph.D. project focuses on the preparation and characterization of nanoparticles and polymer nanocomposites designed for optical applications with particular emphasys on the control of synthesis parameters and on the implementation of new procedures.

About The Author

Delia F. Chillura Martino Ph.D. in Chemical Science (1995). She is presently associate professor at the Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Science and Technology (Università di Palermo), in the Synthesis and Characterization of Nanomaterials laboratory. She is responsible for the HR-TEM, SAXS, NMR labs at Centro Grandi Apparecchiature-ATeN Center.

Her research interests are in the area of physical-chemical properties of materials. She performs research on the development of organic-inorganic composites having catalytic or optical properties, by wet-chemical processes and their characterization by means of Small Angle Scattering, TEM and other techniques.

About The Author

Renato Lombardo Ph.D. in Chemical Sciences (2003). He is presently assistant professor at the Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Science and Technology at the Università di Palermo.

His has many research interests ranging from non linear dynamics and self-organization of matter, to molecular dynamics or food technology with different technique both experimental and computational.

About The Author

Maria Luisa Saladino Ph.D. in Chemical Science (2008). She is currently assistant professor at the Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Science and Technology (Università di Palermo) in the Synthesis and Characterization of Nanomaterials laboratory.

Her research is related to the synthesis and characterization of luminescent nanoparticles, mesoporous silica materials and polymer nanocomposites. Recently, she is also involved in the diagnostic investigations of objects of historic and artistic interest such as paintings on canvas and wood, and paper artefacts and plasters.

About The Author

Mario Berrettoni graduated with honors in Chemistry in 1983. He was awarded research fellowships with private and public institutions. In 1985 he joined the group of Prof. Mamantov of the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (TN—USA) for a 14-months Research Associate position, in the Chemistry department. He is presently associate professor at the Department of Industrial Chemistry in the University of Bologna. His research interests are in the field of the applied electrochemistry, the synthesis and characterization of mixed metal-hexacyanometallates and the study of their applications.

About The Author

Eugenio Caponetti graduated in Chemistry in 1972. He is presently full professor at the Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Science and Technology (Università di Palermo) where he is the head of the Synthesis and Characterization of Nanomaterials laboratory.

His research has been focused in structural and dynamical investigation of dispersed systems and in the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured materials. Recently, he has been involved in the Diagnostic and Characterization of manufacts of archaeological and artistic interest in the field of Cultural Heritages.

Journal Reference

Armetta, F.1, Chillura Martino, D.F.1,2, Lombardo, R.1, Saladino, M.L.1,2, Berrettoni, M.3, Caponetti, E1,2. Synthesis of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet Nanoparticles in Confined Environment, and their Characterization, Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects 511 (2016) 82–90.

Show Affiliations
  1. Dipartimento Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche, Chimiche e Farmaceutiche—STEBICEF, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Parco d’Orleans II, Viale delle Scienze pad. 17, I-90128 Palermo, Italy
  2. Centro Grandi Apparecchiature—ATeN Center, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via F. Marini 14, I-90128 Palermo, Italy
  3. Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale “Toso Montanari” – UOS Rimini, Università di Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40196 Bologna, Italy

 

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