Nanostructuring of anodic copper oxides in fluoride-containing ethylene glycol media

Significance 

The recent technological advancement of nanostructured materials has helped unveil their novel properties that enable their diverse applications in various fields such as in medicine, photonics, and optoelectronics among others. Presently, copper oxides are the most promising amongst the available semiconducting nanostructured materials. As of now, high-temperature processes are most used in the synthesis of copper oxides. These processes encompass several detrimental shortcomings such as the fact that they limit control over the interfacial characteristics of the thin films, and the use of templates and colloidal synthesis methods which leads to low adherence over conducting substrates. Recently, electrochemical anodization has been successfully employed in the fabrication of several nanostructures. Unfortunately, little has been published regarding electrochemical preparation of copper oxide/hydroxide nanostructures that elucidates on the oxidation mechanisms.

To this note, a collaboration Chilean scientists led by Diego P. Oyarzún Jerez and Argentinian researchers at National University of Cordoba led by Omar E. Linarez Pérez proposed a study whose main objective was to comprehend the chemical processes involved during the anodization of copper in alkaline water/ethylene glycol media containing fluoride ions. The research team hoped to successfully obtain specific nanostructures from their proposed method. Their work is currently published in Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry.

Briefly, the research method employed commenced by correlating the dependence of the morphology and chemical composition of the anodized copper surfaces to the experimental conditions. The team then proceeded to study the morphology of the formed nanostructures using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Eventually, they obtained the chemical compositions of the resulting nanostructures by means of Raman and X-Ray photoemission spectroscopy.

The authors observed that in the absence of fluoride, the anodization of copper in alkaline water/ethylene glycol media produced mainly Copper (II) species meanwhile, in fluoride-containing media, Copper (I) oxide formation took place. On the other hand, the researchers realized that the subsequent oxidation to Copper (II) species occurred in the more alkaline media.

The Diego P. Oyarzún Jerez and colleagues study has demonstrated that the anodization of copper in alkaline water/ ethylene glycol media containing fluoride ions generates different nanostructured oxide films. It has been seen that by modifying the anodization conditions nanofibrillar and nanoporous Copper (I) oxide or Copper (II) oxide/copper hydroxide films are obtained. Moreover, the Raman and X-Ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements have provided high quality information about the chemical states of the nanostructured films for the experimental conditions employed. To this end, these findings may allow tuning both the chemical species and the film morphology to generate specific nanostructured materials for potential use in a wide range of applications.

Nanostructuring of anodic copper oxides in fluoride-containing ethylene glycol media-Advances in Engineering

About the author

Diego P. Oyarzún Jerez obtained his Ph.D. in Chemistry (2014) from Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaíso (Valparaíso, Chile). He did a postdoctoral training at the Center of Applied Nanosciences of Faculty of Exacts Sciences of Andrés Bello University (Santiago, Chile) and Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, Córdoba National University (Córdoba, Argentina) focusing on the synthesis and characterization of polymers materials and anodic metal oxide films.

Currently, he is professor and researcher at the Center of Applied Nanosciences of Faculty of Exacts Sciences of Andrés Bello University (Santiago, Chile). Dr. Oyarzún Jerez research interests are focused on the preparation and characterization of nanocomposite materials based in anodic metal oxide and polymeric matrixes.

About the author

Manuel Lopez Teijelo obtained his PhD in Chemistry (1977) from Cordoba National University (Cordoba, Argentina). For more than 25 years, he was full professor of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry at Cordoba National University and Principal Researcher at Argentine Research Council (CONICET). He is currently professor emeritus at Cordoba National University. Dr. Lopez Teijelo was the head of the Department of Physical Chemistry at the Faculty of Chemical Sciences between 1996 and 1998. He was the National Secretary for Argentina of the International Society of Electrochemistry (ISE) between 1994 and 1999, and Vice-President and President of the Iberoamerican Society of Electrochemistry between 2004 and 2008.

His research interests are focused on surfaces and nanostructured materials, especially the modification of metallic surfaces by self-assembled monolayers of aromatic thiols and derivatives, and characterization of nanostructured platforms produced by metal anodization of metallic surfaces.

About the author

Omar E. Linarez Pérez obtained his Ph.D. in Chemistry (2006) from Córdoba National University (Córdoba, Argentina). He did a postdoctoral training at the Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences (Córdoba National University) and at Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaíso (Valparaíso, Chile) focusing on the synthesis and characterization of self-organized nanotubular TiO2 films. Currently, he is assistant professor at the Faculty of Chemical Sciences of Cordoba National University and Adjunct Researcher at Argentine Research Council (CONICET).

Dr. Linarez Pérez research interests are focused on the preparation and characterization of nanostructured platforms produced by metal anodization under controlled conditions or molecular modification of metallic surfaces.

About the author

RAMIRO ARRATIA-PEREZ, graduated as Chemist, Universidad de Chile, 1976 and he obtained Ph.D. in Chemistry with David A. Case in 1983, University of California, Davis, U.S.A. He spent a couple of years (1983-1984) with Cary Y. Yang, University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, California, U.S.A. In 1984-1986 he was Postdoctoral Fellow with Professor Gulzari L. Malli, Simon Fraser University, Canada and in 1986-1988 Visiting Professor & Welch Postdoctoral Fellow, with Professor Denis Marynick, University of Texas at Arlington, U.S.A.

He returned to Chile in 1989 with the following appointments:
1989-199, Assistant Professor Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile,
1991-1994, Associate Professor, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile,
1995 Full Professor in Universidad Austral, Chile,
1999  Director of the Chemical Science Division, Universidad Nacional Andrés Bello, Chile,
2002-2004 Founder and Chairman of the Department of Chemical Sciences and Ph.D. in Molecular Physical Chemistry and Director of Center of Applied Nanosciences of Faculty of Exacts Sciences, Universidad Nacional Andrés Bello, Chile.

Reference

Diego P. Oyarzún Jerez, Manuel López Teijelo, Wilkendry Ramos Cervantes, Omar E. Linarez Pérez, Julio Sánchez, Guadalupe del C. Pizarro, Gabriela Acosta, Marcos Flores, Ramiro Arratia-Perez. Nanostructuring of anodic copper oxides in fluoride-containing ethylene glycol media. Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, volume 807 (2017) page 181–186.

 

Go To Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry

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