New method for controlling electron spin in silicon quantum dots

Significance 

Electron spins in silicon quantum dots refer to the quantum mechanical property of electrons called “spin” when confined within nanoscale structures known as quantum dots. Silicon quantum dots are small regions of silicon with dimensions on the order of a few nanometers, in which electrons are trapped and their motion is confined. The spin of an electron can be thought of as a tiny magnetic moment, analogous to a compass needle pointing in a certain direction. The electron spin can be oriented either “up” or “down,” corresponding to the two possible spin states of the electron. These spin states can be manipulated and measured, making them suitable candidates for qubits in quantum computing and other quantum information processing applications.

One of the primary applications of electron spins in silicon quantum dots is in the field of quantum computing. Qubits based on electron spins in silicon quantum dots hold promise for scalable and practical quantum processors. By using the spin states of electrons as qubits, quantum computations can be performed using quantum gates that manipulate and entangle the spin states. Silicon quantum dots offer advantages such as long coherence times, high gate fidelities, and compatibility with semiconductor manufacturing techniques, making them attractive for realizing quantum computers. Electron spins in silicon quantum dots have also found applications in quantum sensing and can be integrated with electronic devices to enable spin-based data storage and processing, offering potential advantages in terms of non-volatility, low-power consumption, and enhanced data security. Moreover, the spin states of electrons in silicon quantum dots can be used for quantum communication protocols. Entangled electron spins can serve as a resource for secure communication channels, such as quantum key distribution. By exploiting the entanglement of electron spins and their long coherence times, information can be encoded and transmitted in a quantum-secure manner, ensuring privacy and resistance to eavesdropping.

One essential requirement for qubits is the ability to maintain coherence, which refers to the preservation of the quantum state over time. Electron spins in silicon quantum dots have demonstrated long coherence times compared to other qubit implementations. This extended coherence arises from the low sensitivity of silicon to environmental noise and decoherence sources, such as charge fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations. Silicon’s isotopic purity and the reduced presence of nuclear spins contribute to the long coherence times observed in silicon quantum dot qubits.

Gate fidelity measures the accuracy of operations performed on qubits. High gate fidelities are crucial for minimizing errors during quantum operations and improving the overall reliability of quantum computations. Silicon quantum dot qubits benefit from the mature and well-established semiconductor fabrication techniques developed for the silicon industry. These techniques allow for precise control over the qubit operations, resulting in high gate fidelities. The ability to manipulate electron spins in silicon quantum dots with high fidelity is instrumental in achieving reliable and accurate quantum computations.

Silicon quantum dot qubits leverage the existing infrastructure and expertise in silicon-based semiconductor manufacturing. The compatibility with advanced semiconductor manufacturing techniques allows for scalability and integration of qubits with classical electronic components on a single chip. This compatibility paves the way for large-scale quantum processors, enabling the potential for practical quantum computing. Moreover, the silicon platform benefits from established methods for characterizing and mitigating various sources of noise, which can enhance the overall performance of qubits.

One notable recent development in the field of silicon quantum dot qubits is the utilization of spin-valley coupling to achieve coherent control without the need for oscillating electromagnetic fields. Spin-valley coupling refers to the interaction between an electron’s spin and its valley degree of freedom, which is related to its momentum. In silicon, the conduction band has six valleys, and spin-valley coupling allows transitions between states with different spin and valley quantum numbers.

The presence of spin-valley coupling enables coherent control of single- and multi-electron spin states. Researchers have demonstrated Rabi oscillations between effective single-spin states in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot, driven by the spin-valley coupling. This means that by manipulating the valley degree of freedom, one can effectively manipulate the spin state of the electron without requiring oscillating electromagnetic fields. Quantum science has the potential to revolutionize modern technology with more efficient computers, communication, and sensing devices. Challenges remain in achieving these technological goals, however, including how to precisely manipulate information in quantum systems. In a new study published in the peer-reviewed Journal, Nature Physics, University of Rochester researchers led by Professor John Nichol outlined a new method for controlling electron spin in silicon quantum dots tiny, nanoscale semiconductors with remarkable properties as a way to manipulate information in a quantum system. The authors’ findings provide a promising new mechanism for coherent control of qubits based on electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots, which could pave the way for the development of a practical silicon-based quantum computer.

Electron spins in silicon quantum dots have emerged as promising candidates for qubits in quantum computing due to several advantageous characteristics. The authors delve into the reasons why electron spins in silicon quantum dots are excellent qubits, focusing on their long coherence times, high gate fidelities, and compatibility with advanced semiconductor manufacturing techniques. Additionally, they explored the utilization of spin-valley coupling in silicon to achieve coherent control of single- and multi-electron spin states without the need for oscillating electromagnetic fields.

Quantum computers, on the other hand, are based on quantum bits, also known as qubits. Unlike ordinary transistors, which can be either “0” (off) or “1” (on), qubits are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics and can be both “0” and “1” at the same time. Scientists have long considered using silicon quantum dots as qubits; controlling the spin of electrons in quantum dots would offer a way to manipulate the transfer of quantum information. Every electron in a quantum dot has intrinsic magnetism, like a tiny bar magnet. Scientists call this “electron spin” the magnetic moment associated with each electron because each electron is a negatively charged particle that behaves as though it were rapidly spinning, and it is this effective motion that gives rise to the magnetism. Electron spin is a promising candidate for transferring, storing, and processing information in quantum computing because it offers long coherence times and high gate fidelities and is compatible with advanced semiconductor manufacturing techniques. The coherence time of a qubit is the time before the quantum information is lost due to interactions with a noisy environment; long coherence means a longer time to perform computations. High gate fidelity means that the quantum operation researchers are trying to perform is performed exactly as they want. One major challenge in using silicon quantum dots as qubits, however, is controlling electron spin.

The standard method for controlling electron spin is electron spin resonance (ESR), which involves applying oscillating radiofrequency magnetic fields to the qubits. However, this method has several limitations, including the need to generate and precisely control the oscillating magnetic fields in cryogenic environments, where most electron spin qubits are operated. Typically, to generate oscillating magnetic fields, researchers send a current through a wire, and this generates heat, which can disturb cryogenic environments.

The research team outlined a new method for controlling electron spin in silicon quantum dots that does not rely on oscillating electromagnetic fields. The new method is based on a phenomenon called “spin-valley coupling,” which occurs when electrons in silicon quantum dots transition between different spin and valley states. While the spin state of an electron refers to its magnetic properties, the valley state refers to a different property related to the electron’s spatial profile. Professor John Nichol and colleagues applied a voltage pulse to harness the spin-valley coupling effect and manipulate the spin and valley states, controlling the electron spin. In conclusion, electron spins in silicon quantum dots have a wide range of applications, including quantum computing, quantum sensing, spintronics, quantum communication, and fundamental physics studies. Their unique properties, such as long coherence times and compatibility with silicon manufacturing, make them attractive for various quantum technologies, paving the way for advancements in computing, communication, and sensing.

New method for controlling electron spin in silicon quantum dots - Advances in Engineering

About the author

John M. Nichol
Associate Professor of Physics
Rochester University

Professor Nichol’s research interests are in experimental quantum information processing and condensed matter physics. Nichol investigates the quantum mechanics of nanoscale objects, especially individual electrons in semiconductor quantum dots. Nichol’s current research focuses on improving the coherence of electron spin qubits using new materials and control methods, exploring new ways to transfer quantum information between distant spin qubits, and many-body quantum coherence in spin chains.

Reference

Cai, X., Connors, E.J., Edge, L.F. et al (2023). Coherent spin–valley oscillations in silicon. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41567-022-01870-y

Go To Nature Physics

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